257 Mansfield Road City Centre, Nottingham NG1 3FT

Doors: 7:30 pm | Price: £10 adv | Ages: 16+ | Room: The Maze

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The Leylines
West-country collective established in 2013, with a genre-defying, eclectic sound that ranges from traditional folk to full blown festival rock. The Leylines are: Dan Thompson (electric guitar); Dave Burbidge (drums); Hannah Johns (violin); Matthew Wilkins (acoustic guitar); Sean Booth (bass); and Steve Mitchell (vocals/guitar).
The Leylines was founded by a group of musicians in Weston-super-Mare (via Bristol), wishing to combine their individual musical styles into something that isn’t quite folk, sort of punk, 100% heart-pounding revelry. This unique sound, combined with frontman Steve Mitchell’s lyrics centred around life on the road and the state of society, has launched the band into the heart of the live music community and made them firm favourites of the festival circuit.
With a fiercely loyal and ever-growing fan base, The Leylines guarantee to have their audiences up on their feet – and they will be having as much fun as their audience while they’re doing it!

Star Botherers
Folk, (ish) Political, comedy, tongue in cheek, social commentary …type of music…

The Brandy Thieves
Already renowned as one of the Midland’s best live acts, The Brandy Thieves have quickly built a reputation as a band that blows the roof over every venue they play, a band that’s impossible not to dance to. By combining gypsy rhythms and punk energy, ska grooves and folk storytelling, the band has created a sound that is uniquely their own, a sound that has stolen the hearts of all of whom that have seen them perform. ‘Raucous’ ‘Infectious’ ‘Enthralling’ ‘Captivating’ and ‘Sweaty’ are just a few of the words that have been used to describe the alcohol stealing gypsy punks. The five piece are sure to be the highlight for many gig and festival goers, The Brandy Thieves are a band not to be missed.

Jess Silk
A guitarist, singer and songwriter from the Black Country who has been penning songs since her early teens. Over the past few years her style has developed into a husky, shouty brand of folk music that often has her being likened to a female Frank Turner or Billy Bragg.